Sunday, January 31, 2016

A not at all silent Sunday with Punxtitauney Phil

Groundhog Day is an annual traditional that occurs every year on February 2nd. Legend has it that if a groundhog comes out of his burrow and sees his shadow, he'll be frightened and run back to his home and hibernate, signifying six more weeks of winter. If however he doesn't see his shadow, he'll stay out and spring will come six weeks early. There are many weather prognosticating groundhogs around the world and many Groundhog Day celebrations. Arguably the most famous groundhog is Punxsutawney Phil who lives in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, where there are huge Groundhog Day celebrations every year. Other towns and cities have their own groundhogs and celebrations as well including Staten Island Chuck on Staten Island in New York City, New York and Balzac Billy in Balzac, Alberta, Canada.

~~~~most of the information, pictures etc in this post are from http://countdowntogroundhogday.com/   ,please visit it this site for more fun and


 
 






the stump used by Phil when he makes his prediction at Gobbler's Knob


Phantastic Phil - “Phillage”

In Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, there are 32 6 foot tall fiberglass groundhogs scattered throughout the town. These statues are known as Phantastic Phils. The first Phantastic Phil was named “Phillage” and first appeared on Groundhog Day, 2004. It was sponsored by The Groundhog Cluband painted by local artist Kelly Porada. I took this photo of the statue on a recent trip to Punxsutawney.

punxsutawney punxsutawney phil groundhogday groundhog day pennsylvania phillage statue groundhog statue

During the hours before dawn on February 2nd, a crowd of hearty revelers gather on Gobbler's Knob  to await Phil's prediction.  If however you are the more stay at home type of  you might want to gather a group of friends and some refreshments and sing  some groundhog carols while waiting for Phil to make his appearance.  There are more songs and activities on the website. 



The Twelve Days of Groundhog Day lyrics
On the first day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
A baby groundhog on the ground.

On the second day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

On the third day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Three digging groundhogs,
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

On the fourth day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Four flying groundhogs,
Three digging groundhogs,
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

On the fifth day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Five singing groundhogs,
Four flying groundhogs,
Three digging groundhogs,
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

On the sixth day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Six pet groundhogs,
Five singing groundhogs,
Four flying groundhogs,
Three digging groundhogs,
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

On the seventh day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Seven hungry groundhogs,
Six pet groundhogs,
Five singing groundhogs,
Four flying groundhogs,
Three digging groundhogs,
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

On the eighth day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Eight swimming groundhogs,
Seven hungry groundhogs,
Six pet groundhogs,
Five singing groundhogs,
Four flying groundhogs,
Three digging groundhogs,
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

On the ninth day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Nine king groundhogs,
Eight swimming groundhogs,
Seven hungry groundhogs,
Six pet groundhogs,
Five singing groundhogs,
Four flying groundhogs,
Three digging groundhogs,
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

On the tenth day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Ten growling groundhogs,
Nine king groundhogs,
Eight swimming groundhogs,
Seven hungry groundhogs,
Six pet groundhogs,
Five singing groundhogs,
Four flying groundhogs,
Three digging groundhogs,
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

On the eleventh day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Eleven bouncy groundhogs,
Ten growling groundhogs,
Nine king groundhogs,
Eight swimming groundhogs,
Seven hungry groundhogs,
Six pet groundhogs,
Five singing groundhogs,
Four flying groundhogs,
Three digging groundhogs,
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

On the twelfth day of Groundhog Day
an acquaintance gave to me:
Twelve mommy groundhogs,
Eleven bouncy groundhogs,
Ten growling groundhogs,
Nine king groundhogs,
Eight swimming groundhogs,
Seven hungry groundhogs,
Six pet groundhogs,
Five singing groundhogs,
Four flying groundhogs,
Three digging groundhogs,
Two fuzzy groundhogs,
And a baby groundhog on the ground!

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

The wonderfulness of Social Media on a bitter cold day

 subtitle~~  Your attention please, History Channel, potential programming idea


 The weather has been really cold, going outside is so no fun, so I thought, why not take this time as an excuse to upgrade my knowledge of what is popular in social media.  And other than the sundry political chatter , it still seems the major topics are ridiculous shoes and cats.   The idea that cats are aliens is really a new one to me, but then they have been worshipped by the Egyptians and reviled by the Christian Church, who among other things thought cats were lazy and useless and that rats were industrious and to show their approval of the vile vermin put them into church art, but the rats carried the plague and well we know how that worked out, don't we: and a whole bunch of stuff  has been said about them by much less reliable souses, so who knows.   If you turn your head just so and squint a bit, and unfocus you eyes they look like the alien in the closing credits of Star Trek, who I affectionately call Herbert F. Solow , because that is the name imprinted over his image, and BTW , there is a real Mr. Solow, hes about 85 and has written about His years working at Desilu Studios,and working on Star Trek and OMG, IDK but I think that image of the alien has inspired the "grays" just using the theory on mass illusion, just sayin'.  Oh, and before I forget, I always wondered why Desilu Studios made Star Trek, I mean weren't they about sit coms??  An furthermore bet you didn't know Lucille Ball was born in Jamestown , New York, and that here is a big mural of her and Desi and Fred and Ethel on the side of a building there. She was a very intelligent woman and once said something like, "You have to be smart to play dumb."  that should be a meme.

So the other day someone asked me who created the internet, and why.  I didn't know the answer, but I know I can search it  and find the answer.  But being smart mouthed I said  " You ever hear that thing about aliens thinking cats are worshipped by humans, and they created the internet so that they could post tributes to them?". 
She seemed to think I was serious, well I wasn't then, but now I am.  " Yeah, I get  it."she said "and you know that guy on Ancient Aliens he should do a program about  cats."  don't you just hate that moment when you don't know how to answer?  Yeah, that's right! 

So later on I looked it up, Googled it, and look what I found.  and there were all sorts of obviously Photoshopped  pictures and out of focus video  of weird occurrences and even weirder creatures. 

However these videos are in focus,I mean I know this is like supposed to be funny, but ....but I just can't help wondering.   And I hate it when that happens, it's creepy, not like dolls or clowns, neither of which I  think are creepy, but more like when two people say the same thing at the same time.  I watched  several hours of this evidence, purely for research.



and as if that wasn't enough, hers another one

This stuff is all entertainment, something to do on a day when it is too cold and the snow is so deep you can't even get out of the driveway, or just don't want to.  It's probably OK to include your cat, because after all your cat might know more than you know, probably has 9 lives, kinda like Dr Who, and has probably trained you telepathically to do his or her bidding and be his or her obedient slave.  Anyway that was how it always works at my house.   All that cuteness and intelligence too, imagine that.

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

haiku~~~~my feet are cold

 
 
snow falling all night
 feet so cold I couldn't sleep
the sun is coming up
 
 
 

Saturday, January 23, 2016

fullmoon Wolf Moon


The last few nights I have been awakened by the light of the waxing gibbous moon.  I find myself looking up at it, like others must have done and might even be doing now .  Wondering about everything and nothing,at this most introspective time of the year.  Earth is in it wintery doldrums, and I feel the still and quiet of these cold nights,  nights too cold to leave the comfort of a pile of blankets and even listen for the mating call of  an owl, walk out under the stars, or lean out the back door. 

Everyday, the sunset comes a little later, and the cold deepens a little, but soon the earth's orbit and the lengthening days will  begin to wake the earth from it's dormancy. 


Wolf Moon is probably the best known name for the January full moon, it harkens back to Medieval times, when hungry packs of wolves were searching for their next meal, surely their howls could be heard at night, and certainly they were not as welcome as the calls of owls searching for a mate.   Livestock was often kept in the home at this time of year keeping it safe and keeping it from freezing to death. This name is also attributed to Indigenous Americans for much the same reason.

The Ancient Celtic name for this moon was the Quiet Moon,  those who live in the woods even in modern times,  will tell you that it is quiet.  And it must have been an eerie stillness for those long ago, as it is for me today.  For me this moon is a time of rest, contemplation, and wonder before the earth reawakens and there is again much to be done.

Other traditional names include, Cold Moon, Embers Moon,Moon after Yule, Deep Snows Moon, Long Nights Moon, First Moon, Howling Spirit moon, Pine Moon. Falling branches Moon.   If I would name the January full moon the Owl Moon, for soon I will be able to call to the owls from my back door  and when they answer I will know all is as it should be.




Thursday, January 21, 2016

me, the huffington post and some other people on Winnie the Pooh

I have to admit that this is a few days late, but dear reader I wanted to share it with you anyway.

There is a well worn and well love copy of "Winnie the Pooh" in my bookcase, it is one of those books that I will always go back to.  I didn't discover the wonders of  the Hundred Acre Woods until I was in High School and chosen to be Christopher Robin in a class play.   I became a big fan of the American actor Sterling Holloway who was the voice of Pooh, and read everything I could on and by A.A, Milne.  


The Real Forest That Inspired Winnie-The-Pooh's Hundred Acre Wood

In honor of national Winnie-the-Pooh day, step inside Ashdown Forest.

01/18/2016 11:04 am ET

Philip Toscano/PA Archive
Today is national Winnie-the-Pooh day, otherwise known as the birthday of English author A.A. Milne. He's the man who brought our favorite honey-obsessed bear to life in that eponymous book published back in 1926 -- Winnie-the-Pooh.
It was Milne's son -- a boy named Christopher Robin -- who, with his very own teddy bear named Winnie, inspired the basis of a universe populated by Piglet, Eeyore, Tigger, Kanga and Roo. Together, the characters, many based on Christopher's actual toys, lived in a fictional land dubbed the Hundred Acre Wood, filled with woozles and heffalumps and the perfect spots for playing Poohsticks.
The Hundred Acre Wood was, like most of the component parts of Milne's story, also inspired by a real fragment of his nonfictional life. The setting of Winnie-the-Pooh is based on the Sussex wildlife haven known as Ashdown Forest, a 5,000-acre wood dotted with silver birches and pine trees about 30 miles south of London. In fact, many of the E.H. Shepard's drawings for the Winnie-the-Pooh mimic the picturesque heathlands of Ashdown.
Kathryn Aalto
Galleons Lap is based on the real Gills Lap.

Thanks to a timely new book, fans of Pooh, Owl, Rabbit and the rest can experience the magic of Ashdown. The Natural World of Winnie-the-Pooh by Kathryn Aalto takes readers on a visual tour of the English countryside, accompanied by copies of Shepard's familiar sketches. Aalto moves from the house where Milne wrote Pooh's first moments to the paths Christopher Robin trekked in his boyhood to the car park at Gills Lap, the Sussex counterpart to Pooh's Galleons Lap. Each destination is imbued with the lore we remember from the Hundred Acre Wood.
Roo's Sandy Pit, the enchanted place and the floody place, the spot for pickniking and that finicky bee tree -- all are portrayed in one way or another. The woods of Milne's lifetime have bended and broken over time, but treasures remain, whether a bridge or a just sandy place.
"Time stands still in the fictional Hundred Acre Wood," Aalto writes. "In our childhood imaginations, the forest and woods where Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends wander might be a static place visited only when we were young. In the real setting of Ashdown Forest, of course, the living, breathing landscape has changed."
Kathryn Aalto

Aalto's book is filled with biographical details from Milne's life, illustrated reminders of Shepard's whimsical genius, and even tidbits of trivia that reflect on the real flora and fauna of Ashdown. Aalto recounts everything from the forest's surrounding area, Hartfield Village, to Milne's home at Cotchford Farm, all the while reminiscing over the fantasy parts too: Pooh's trap for the heffalumps and Eeyore's gloomy place.
Devoted readers will relish these parts, particularly the official rules for playing Poohsticks:
1. Bring your own wooden Poohsticks.
2. All sticks should be the same weight or size. If similar looking, paint yours in jaunty colors.
3. Choose a starter to say, "Ready, steady, go!"
4. Competitors stand side-by-side, facing upstream.
5. Leaning over the bridge, stick out your arm so that the sticks are all at the same height from river surface to bridge.
6. At the sound of "Go!" all competitors let go of their sticks. (Sticks should not be thrown or hurled into the water.)
7. Rush to the other side of the bridge.
8. The first stick to emerge under the bridge has won.
9. Repeat over and over and over and ...
Chris Robin courtesy Brian Sibley
Christopher Robin with Pooh, Piglet, and Roo in the original walnut tree.

In honor of the 90th anniversary of Milne's original book, which will be celebrated this year, take a peek at photos of Ashdown here. Let us know how you are celebrating Winnie-the-Pooh day in the comments.
The Natural World of Winnie-the-Pooh: A Walk Through the Forest That Inspired the Hundred Acre Wood by Kathryn Aalto is available through Timber Press.
Kathryn Aalto
Poohsticks Bridge.
Kathryn Aalto
Eeyore houses spring up in the woods of Ashdown Forest.
Kathryn Aalto
An autumn trail of bracken leads to the ghyll that inspired the North Pole Expotition.
Kathryn Aalto
Frothy fields of rapeseed near Hartfield.
Kathryn Aalto
Surprises along the footpath to Poohsticks Bridge.
Kathryn Aalto
Inside the spinney at Cotchford Farm.
Kathryn Aalto
Donkeys in the pasture at Cotchford Farm.
Kathryn Aalto
Though it was  an out of character song  for the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, have a listen to The House at Pooh Corner. 

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

haiku~~~~campfire coffee

 


wood smoke and coffee
wood pops, fire glows, coffee perks
I wait with my cup

Monday, January 18, 2016

RIP Grizzly Adams

The Nightly News was on in the background as I was struggling with some papework, I always struggle with paperwork , that is nothing new, when I heard the Dan Haggerty  had died.   Grizzly Adams can't die!  No Grizzly Adams can't die, he is a fictional character, but the man who brought him to life can.  I felt the loss, of a part of my history, my generation's history.  Being a Mountain man or woman, and living off the land, living in harmony with nature, a solitary and contemplative life in the shadow of the Rockies, it was a dream, a goal for some in my generation.  Now all these years later, after having lead a simple life in the shadow of the Appalachians, trying to live off the land is difficult, but living a contemplative, simple life as close to the land as possible is as close as perfection as I will ever get.  

Just a mountain man and his  grizzly bear, but it made for  great TV back in 77-78.  Everyone  I knew watched it and talked about it, wondered what it would be like to be him, and were pretty sure that there was no way a grizzly could  ever really be like Ben, but hoped anyway.  It fit the times, not those long ago time it was set in, but the times we were living in then. Those times that influenced some of use to try and make their lives as close to the land as possible, it was optimistic, and so were we, it had Mad Jack, and his mule, and the "Maniac" book, some times I still hear someone call the Almanac the Maniac book, and sometimes I wish for a button bracelet like Dan Haggarty wore.  

I know very little about Dan Haggerty, I know he loved motorcycles and once owned a restaurant, one year he did a New Year Eve show,  his home got picked by American Pickers, and he was briefly in a SyFy movie.   And he left behind in Grizzly Adams a legacy



Actor Dan Haggerty Has Died at 74

PHOTO: Pictured in this undated photo is Bozo the Bear as Ben and Dan Haggerty as James Grizzly Adams in the TV show "The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams" in the episode, "A Bears Life." Frank Carroll/Getty Images
Pictured in this undated photo is Bozo the Bear as Ben and Dan Haggerty as James 'Grizzly' Adams in the TV show "The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams" in the episode, "A Bear's Life." more +

 Dan Haggerty, who fans know as Grizzly Adams, died early Friday morning at the age of 74 from cancer, ABC News has confirmed with the actor's manager Terry Bomar.
Haggerty starred as Grizzly Adams in the 1974 film "The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams" and the subsequent TV series of the same name, which ran from 1977 to 1978.
"Dan Haggerty, a beloved Father and friend, has died at 4:30 this morning at St Joseph Hospital in Burbank, CA, surrounded by his family that loved him. He had fought a long hard battle with cancer of the spine that was discovered in August of this year," Bomar wrote in a press release.
He continued, "All the awards pale in comparison to his huge laugh and wonderful sense of humor that made everyone laugh with him. He would light up any room he entered. He loved life, loved his family, loved his friends and fans."

The actor, who was originally from Wisconsin, then went on to appear in several films and TV shows, including "Charlie's Angels" in 1981 and "The Love Boat" in 1983.
Some of Haggerty's most recent projects included an appearance in "Axe Giant: The Wrath of Paul Bunyan" and "Dead in 5 Heartbeats," both released in 2013.


Thursday, January 14, 2016

Creativity in all things

In every parent's life comes that day when their darling toddlers learns certain words, some of which were perfectly acceptable in oh, say, Middle or Early English, some even used regularly by the likes of Martin Luther.   But use them now, in our modern times, well certainly not.
 
Ah, one day, many years ago, my child began to talk like me.   Expletives, and cuss words danced  wittily across his young lips as if he were an old Seadog.  He painted a rich canvas of peculiarly coupled yet colorful language.    Which posed no real annoyance to me, until he dropped the bomb.   I pondered for awhile, how I should explain to him about certain words.  I pondered for too long.   He reasoned it out for himself, he reasoned that if he uttered certain words to certain people he would create a  bluster of fluster.  An endlessly good source of rainy-day fun, or amusement when the rest of the world was dullsville.   Toddlers really do like to stir things up.  Some other people would say, little or nothing, which was no fun, and definitely not the response he was looking for.
 
Before I knew it my sweet little toddler was in Kindergarten, and then first grade, and peer pressure kicked in.   And his fluidity in coarse language served him well. 
He could swear like a man, though I am not at all sure he knew the nuances of his utterances. He could string  words together, he was the Shakespeare of cuss words. 
His exceptionally good memory was a great help to him.  Most of the time he managed not to use his colorful verbosity in front of teachers.   His Mother was secretly very proud of him, yes I was.
 
Then came  that phone call.    From his school.  And so it was time for creative  problem solving.   And I hatched what I thought was a clever plan.   Why not come up with something other than cuss words, say witty insults.  A time honored custom, the first one I can remember hearing was "Your mother wears Army boots!".   The taunting French knights in "Monthy Python's the holy Grail "  inspire me to this day.  Our masterpiece was "You swear like a girl", though looking at it now, that statement could be more problematic that all of the colorful oaths we were trying to avoid put together.
 
Oh,that I would have had this wonderful tool, adapted by some scholarly human from the works of the Bard, verily it would have made things much easier.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

haiku~~~ open window



 


 
wind roaring a storm
but on the other side calm
this wall, this window

Not at all silent Sunday

photo by Km Zurn words by Chelsey Bahe, please visit her wonderfilled page on Facebook Take 'Em Outside